Niche.com Ranks SPP a Top Private School in Minnesota

Just in time for the start of the school year, Niche.com, a website that ranks public and private schools, has named St. Paul Preparatory School the 15th best private school in the state of Minnesota out of 74 schools.

As a part of their ranking, St. Paul Prep was named the #1 school, public or private, for diversity in Minnesota. We also rated high in the academics and college prep categories.

Over the years, St. Paul Prep has scored and ranked highly by Niche.com. Thanks to all students, teachers, staff, and everyone else for making SPP a truly special place!

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Check It Out: Minnesota State Fair

In America, fairs are as common as baseball and apple pie in summertime. There are town fairs, county fairs, state fairs…and then there’s the Minnesota State Fair.

Widely regarded as one of the best state fairs in America, the “Great Minnesota Get-Together” has transformed from an agricultural showcase in its inaugural run (in 1859), to the vast entertainment and eating event of the year that it is today.

If you’re new to the Land of 10,000 Lakes (and the U.S.), attending the state fair is a big ol’ helping of Minnesota (and American) culture. Here’s a list of some cannot-miss attractions (and foods, of course).

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Sweet Martha’s Cookies

Why have one when you can buy ’em by the bucket?! Martha has been making her sweet treats for over 30 years, and no trip to the fair is complete without a stop at Sweet Martha’s.

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Giant Slide

Debuting in 1968, the Giant Slide is a rite of passage for Minnesotans new and old. Don’t let the long line fool you: it goes fast.

ALL THE FOOD

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With 56 new items just this year, the state fair is a foodie’s dream (though it might be a nightmare on your wallet!) Plus, everything “on a stick” looks great on Instagram! From cheese curds to deep fried Oreos to mini donuts to sweet, crisp corn on the cob, if you can dream it, there’s probably some form of it at the fair. (Check out Andrew Zimmern’s list, too).

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Sky Ride

Avoid slow walkers and strollers: take a ride on the Sky Ride! This bird’s-eye-view of the fair has been in operation for 53 years now, and is the preferred choice for people watching on the midway.

Concerts

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From big-name Grandstand acts to free performances at the Bandshell, you can find music pretty much everywhere and at any time from now until Labor Day.

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Farm stuff

It wouldn’t be a fair without animals (specifically livestock), so make sure to check out the various barns for a chance at getting up-close and personal with Minnesota’s more furry friends. From sheep to snakes, draft horses to bunnies, there are all kinds of opportunities to see all types of creatures.

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All-things Minnesotan

From a giant tank of native fish to rubbing elbows with Minnesota’s members of Congress, if something is labeled as ‘Minnesotan’, there’s a good chance you can find it in some form at the fair.

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Whether you go for the food, animals, people-watching, or attractions, there is truly something for everyone at the Great Minnesota Get-Together. But hurry! The fair ends Labor Day (Sept. 4).

TwInstagram Cities

Whether in St. Paul or Minneapolis, there are plenty of opportunities around the Twin Cities to snap an iconic photo and rack up the likes!

These spots are sure to get your followers to double-tap!

#1 Minnehaha Falls, Minneapolis

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Not many other places can lay claim to a 60-foot waterfall within city limits, but head to Minnehaha Park near the Mississippi River in southeast Minneapolis, and your ‘Gram will earn #waterfullhunter status immediately!

#2 Cathedral of St. Paul

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Serving as the Co-Cathedral of the Archdiocese of Minneapolis-St.Paul, the immense Cathedral overlooking downtown St. Paul. It took seven years to build (1907-14). In recent years, Red Bull’s “Crashed Ice” has been held in front of the cathedral.

#3 Stone Arch Bridge, Minneapolis

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Standing as the only fully stone arch bridge across the Mississippi River, this former railroad bridge has become an icon in the Mill City (Minneapolis’ old nickname). Great spot to snag pictures of the Minneapolis skyline and St. Anthony Falls.

#4 Sunken Garden/Conservatory, Como Zoo, St. Paul

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Let your filters run wild! A popular place for weddings, the flowers in the sunken garden change with the seasons, but it’s always a balmy, tropical feeling inside! And, while you’re at it, check out some monkeys over at the zoo!

#5 Minneapolis Sculpture Garden

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Snag one of the most recognizable images from the Twin Cities with a picture of the Cherry & Spoon Bridge in Minneapolis’ newly redesigned Sculpture Garden. It now features a 25-foot blue rooster, as well.

#6 Downtown St. Paul from Indian Mounds Park

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You can get a good ‘gram of downtown St. Paul in a number of places, but one of our favorites is from Indian Mounds Park. Colorful sunsets make for a good background of the “Saintly City”.

#7 Mall of America

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Take pictures shopping! Take pictures building a bear! Take pictures riding an indoor rollercoaster! Take pictures of your food! Endless photo ops here!

#8 St. Paul Saints game

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Crazy promotions? Check. Cheap tickets? Check. Ball Pig? CHECK! Welcome to the joys of a St. Paul Saints baseball game. What is a Ball Pig, you ask? Well, get ready to fill your Insta with fun. Also, the stadium is just a block from St. Paul Prep!

#9 Minneapolis Institute of Art

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Like old art? Like new art? Don’t like art? Go to the Minneapolis Institute of Art and be amazed! (And amaze your followers with pictures of 2,000-year-old pots)

#10 Rice or Mears Park, St. Paul

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Rice Park is good for that “winter wonderland” ‘gram, while Mears Park is a beautiful summer oasis. Both are located in the middle of downtown St. Paul, and are great places for students to escape and snag a few filter-ready pics!

Where are your favorite spots for the best ‘gram in the Twin Cities? Let us know! Follow us on Insta @stpaulprep!

St. Paul Prep Class of 2017

It has been one amazing year at St. Paul Prep! If you missed our live stream of the graduation ceremony, you can watch a video of the entire event right here.

Below are some photos from the ceremony. If you have any pictures you’d like to share, email them to skoob@nacelopendoor.org or tag us on Facebook or Instagram.

Thank you seniors. You made 2016-17 an epic year at SPP!

 

A Crisis At Home While Abroad

fullsizerender-8In my first blog post, I explained how I got to SPP and why I wanted to leave my city in Venezuela so badly; however, what I didn’t mention is why my parents wanted me to leave just as much as I did.

I would love to explain to you more in depth the roots of my nation’s issues, but as a person who deplores politics (probably because of my experience), I don’t feel like a have a voice in this matter; however, I can tell you what it was like living under such regime.

These past few years have been of profound crisis for my country; inflation increases daily -sometimes even 500% within a week. There’s scarcity of every product you can think of, and I dare to call it one of the most dangerous countries in the world. Luckily, my family has not been as heavily affected as other unfortunate families, but that doesn’t mean I can’t share the pain.

Years ago, I remember people being so happy you could always feel a kind and zealous vibe around, but these last two years specially, crisis reached its brink and people are simply miserable.

As inflation keeps rising, people don’t have any money of actual value to buy anything. You see them wandering in the streets looking for something to eat inside garbage bags, you see them desperately waiting for a mango to fall from its enormous tree, you see them starving to death. And when they can actually afford products, they form interminable lines under the 104 °F sun hitting right at you; all the wait so when they actually enter the supermarket everything is gone. Two years ago my mom picked me up at 3am from a party, and on my way home I still remember looking at hundreds, maybe thousands of people already lined up outside the market waiting for it to open the next day. “It is absurd,” I said to my mom, but then she replied, “Vale, in times of crisis and need people behave irrationally to find a way to survive.”

I guess she was right, but a lot of them also supported the government during the elections, so watching them lose their dignity caused me more anger than sadness.

But anyways, other than our economy, when we are not dying from starvation, we are getting killed in the streets. Human lives became so incredibly worthless for criminals; it is not good enough for them to just steal from you, they have the urge to also kill you.

My parents feared my stay in Venezuela; I was in too much danger so they sent me here, but that did not take any of my preoccupation away. Weeks ago my country became an official dictatorship, and our citizens have been protesting ever since, but it only makes me more and more psychotic about what will happen. What has been the beginning of May for me? I have nightmares that wake me up in the dawn at least once a week. I know that the impression I give at school is of a very happy and positive person, but that doesn’t mean I’m not being internally consumed.

I might be theoretically out of danger here in the U.S. but knowing that my family is still there, taking every risk I am avoiding, keeps me from evading the fear, anxiety, and pain anyway. Honestly, do you want to know why I came here? I was pushed away by the government from the most beautiful land and people I’ve ever seen who have now turned miserable and mediocre by the evil in power. The thing I hope the most right now is for the government to finally be overthrown by the protesters today and go back to my home tomorrow and happily read headlines in every newspaper “Millions of Venezuelans all around the world go back to their home land.”

Guest Blogger Aleksander: Tabula Rasa Part 2

IMG_1513I hope you’re all familiar with the term “butterfly effect.” If not, it is a concept that theorizes how small causes can have large effects, such as the flap of the wings of a butterfly in Rio de Janeiro changing the weather in Chicago. Let that sink in for a moment.

This post will be a rather positive example of this theory. I want to tell you all how the trip to the USA saved my life. Literally, not just figuratively.

Test day

The air in the room was very dense. We sat at tables and looked at each other in terror. “What happens next?” – everyone thought.

It’s not an excerpt from a horror book. It’s simply an accurate description of how the test day went down. It was the day when we were given the tests to asses our knowledge of math, English, etc. I remember that very first day I met the person who altered my life: Margaux. Long story short, thanks to her I have identified depression, anxiety, and OCD in myself. Now, three years down the road, I am in the middle of therapy, that I’ve started last year.

What would have happened if I wouldn’t have met her in America? Or rather – what would have happened if I would not have talked to the representative of the American Embassy in Poland? I could have been dead by now. While of course, that’s just my interpretation, many other bad things could have happened, too.

What else saved me? The Mobile Jazz Project. This project changed my life. Let me explain:

It is a project where young people interested in making and/or playing music (not necessarily talented; of course there were some brilliant musicians, but talent was not necessary) could do what they wanted to do – transform their thoughts into language understood by everyone on earth (music). Every week we listened to a short musical performance. Then there was a time for questions for the performing artist/band. After that, people could split into dedicated groups. I remember that I was in a “tech” group which created music from scratch in Pro Tools. At the end, I recorded my take on “Superstition” by Stevie Wonder. I was very inspired by Stevie Wonder’s pop/funky sounds and Jimmy Ray Vaughn’s cover of the song, so I decided to combine these two styles.

Right now, in my bedroom, I have a MIDI keyboard, an electric guitar ,and Ableton Live installed on my PC. Music was an escape during my dark days. If you want to hear some of my jams, go to my soundcloud profile. It also led me to publish my pictures on the internet. If you want to see some of them, go to my society6 profile. The Mobile Jazz Project showed me that if I want, I can be an artist, too. It’s up to me. I actually liked the idea of becoming a music producer so much that I went on a tour of a college where I could get MA in music production. I loved everything except for the price. So I am studying in Warsaw instead. That’s another one of these things I still regret.

I wish you actually realized how different the teachers I met in SPP were from my teachers in Poland. Teachers in Poland would MOSTLY (not all) destroy your grades. They would bomb you with everything until you just couldn’t take it anymore. The teachers at SPP were so much different. They encourage you to learn. They praise you when you have done a good job. Ms. Larson showed me that math can be bearable. Ms. Stormont showed me that I also can be a good writer. Ms. Redding showed me that democracy in a classroom works.

If you are going to get out one thing out of this article, then let it be this: if you feel that you need a change, go and make it happen.

A Step Forward

fullsizerender-8By current SPP student Valeria from Venezuela

Since 8th grade, I’ve been looking forward to graduation day; to finally step out of school and enter college; to study things I care about, and to surpass the limitations I was given in my previous schools. However, in senior year I felt different.

“You’re too immature, Valeria. Too immature, too young, and too dependent on your parents for you to leave to college,” a little voice whispered inside my head.

During the first two months of my stay in St. Paul, I was struck with the realization I was not prepared to enter this new phase of my life. It all started at the beginning of the first semester last fall. The story goes a little something like this:

I was clueless as to what university I wanted to go to, nostalgic of my family and culture, out of my elements in class, dispirited in my only A.P course, and consumed by preoccupation over standardized testing for colleges. The weight of my responsibilities kept sinking me to the bottom as I drowned on my own. I had never struggled in my life without having someone to make it better, as I grew up in a collectivist culture. For quite a while, I thought that I had lost that here, until one day as I sat alone studying for the SAT, one of my teachers took the initiative to help me out a little. Every day that I sat down with him, I sighed of relief; his sincere willingness to help me without receiving anything in return was heart-warming. His advice not only brought tranquility to my soul, but gave me strength to stay persistent. I was no longer alone.

In addition, later on Vicky came into my life. I had gone to our school counselor Ms. Hill several times, however what I wanted her to do for me would have required the use of too much of her time, considering that she had to guide 63 other seniors (some that might be even more lost than me in such a labyrinth).

Ms. Hill, being the consummate professional that she is, sensed I was lost at sea, and so she reined me in back to shore. She gave me a small, fairly mundane, contact card with the name “Vicky” sprawled in simple black lettering (little did I know the impact that small, mundane card would have on my college search). Vicky is a former SPP counselor and Advanced English Composition teacher who left her teaching job for a job as a lawyer; still, she spends her free time helping students in my situation.

I still had a sea of colleges to pick and choose from, and yet the question remained, where would I really fit in? Which one would have the best broadcast journalism program? Which one would have the biggest diversity of cultures? Which one this? Which one that? Which one? Vicky helped me figure all this out by making me form my own conclusions.

I had to re-start my college search, only this time with her there, over my shoulder guiding me. To be frank, I was irritated that I’d have to start the search process all over again from scratch, but looking back it was probably the best thing that I could have done. When I was on my own, I let my own bias for big name schools get in the way of what I was really looking for, and began to apply to colleges that offered a curriculum I did not even want or would not even be helpful for my desired career.

Can you imagine? Going to a college I don’t like, far away from my family and home (which was a sacrifice I guess I was willing to make) and coping with the stress of college life who knows how. I was well on my way to imploding because of how unprepared I was for college, the concept of adult independence was still new to me and I wouldn’t have an altruistic teacher to guide me anymore. Thanks to Vicky, all the self-destruction was spared.

Vicky also made me understand the one thing that kept on adding weight on my shoulders. This whole time, I had been looking for some sort of emotional shelter within my Host Family and I failed in my attempts. I told Vicky the story of how I couldn’t find emotional comfort with them, and she said, “Valeria, you cannot go to a hardware store and expect to buy raisins, you have to go to a grocery store for that. What you are looking for is something they might not be able to provide you with, because they are simply not used to it. There will be other people, like your teacher, that will make your experience unique and fascinating, leaving a mark in your heart.”

And she was right, I was looking in the wrong places. My Host Family had been great, but they were not the ones that would give me the affection and support I craved. Emotionally, the burden was off my back as I stopped making my Host Family into something they were not: my actual family or any Venezuelan. I finally understood I couldn’t force them to act like my culture does.

A month later, I was in Ashburn, Virginia spending Christmas with my family and finally finishing my college applications. All the stress was gone, but something was still aching. Was I really satisfied with my decisions?…I think I wasn’t.

I left my father’s family living in Ashburn for a few days to visit my mother’s sister in Washington D.C. Her name is Carmen Beatriz, but I always called her Aunty Triz. I hadn’t seen her in years because Venezuela’s situation forced her (along with many other relatives and friends) to leave me. We had a great time together, but the clock was ticking and it was time for me to go back to Ashburn.

As we were getting closer and closer to Ashburn, anxiety kept taking over me and when I had to say goodbye I shattered. That’s what had been bugging me this whole time. Ever since September all the way to that cold night in December, I realized I was unsatisfied because I will never be able to live in peace If I am away from the warm people I love and the culture that shaped every aspect of my personality. Although the Universities I applied to were the best options when it came to the education they would provide; wasn’t my personal happiness a huge factor to consider as well? I never thought about it because I did not think it was a thing that would bother me. I had always been a happy person, but I wasn’t in the culture that I’m from; the one that truly brings me internal peace and enamors me more each day of my existence.

That night was a massive paradox to me, I was broken and cured. It cleared my blurred vision and I realized what I’d wanted this whole time: great education near my family. What a better place for that than Colombia? The most similar country to Venezuela that offers me infinite opportunities and a near location to my precious home. Today, I see clearly what I want, and feel immensely grateful for my teacher, who will always have a place in my heart, Vicky, and my school SPP. Without them I would have made the wrong decisions and postponed my happiness and inner serenity. Moreover, SPP, its passionate staff, and my experience with them taught me how to manage my time, control stress, work hard independently, but most importantly prepare me for the next phase of my life.